Jive | Emo Dojo
Jive | Emo Dojo

Episode 126 · 7 months ago

The Importance of Hobbies w/ Alex Hobby from “Time For Your Hobby Podcast”

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

John Emotions talks with Alex Hobby about his podcast, "Time For Your Hobby."

We cover the importance of our daily activities; which ones are for pleasure, and which ones are for money. Alex shares some of the more interesting hobbies he's covered on his show (including podcasting), and they discuss the inherent value in doing things without any expectation of pay.

We also learn about Alex's new game, Pitch That Pod, currently in development!

Alex on Twitter:https://twitter.com/tfyhpodcast Alex's game, Pitch That Pod, on Twitter:https://twitter.com/Pitchthatpod Alex Hobby's Useful Podcast Resources:https://docs.google.com/document/d/1dRcTvIm8Eoqgi9-1X9EMTW8AnCTflCgIBftzIdSX7Gs/edit 

John Emotions explores mental health and technology with artists from around the world, live from Emo Dojo. Contact John at 1 (405) 440-3330, or on Twitter @johnemotions

Hey, Hey, what's up? Friends, Johnny motions here. This is Emo Dojo and I'm glad you made it so before we get started, just a quick update. You know, I wanted to give a shout out to several people that followed the show regularly and they keep quiet but I know that they're there. So shout out to aimes, Kaia, Angie, Tony, Marcy and now Jeff. So it turns out I got a great letter from Jeff the other day. I have a like a guest link that if people want to be on the show, they can just click a linkol and be a guest on the show. Jeff filled this out and sent me a really nice letter and it turns out Jeff drives a tractor in the middle of America for forty hours a week and listens to podcasts a lot and he's listened to all of these episodes, some of them more than once. So I really appreciate you, Jeff, and it kind of puts the the pressure on to make a better podcast, maybe something that's worthy of somebody to listen to while the driving a tractor doing God's work forty hours a week. So thanks for that letter. I will up my game. I appreciate you all. Thanks again for everything. I've got two interviews in the can right now, the one you are about to hear with Alex and another one with Marcy that I did on twitter spaces. So you'll have that one, those two to listen to, and then after that I'm going to get to the one I promised a while back on something called Alexei thimia, and also during that one I'll give you an update on the rest of what's going on in my regular life. Exciting things, you know, kind of things that have also caused me to push back uploading episodes as frequently as I'd like, but will soon change and maybe let me upload episodes almost on a daily basis if I feel like it. So things are progressing. It's kind of weird sometimes when life and the world just seems like it's going further into chaos. My life seems to be getting better and I always feel somewhat guilty about that, I guess. Anyway. So let's step into the Dojo here and talk to my esteemed guest, Alex Hobby here on Emo Dojo. So a little context for this conversation. Humans engage in all sorts of activities. Right, everything we do can be called an activity, sleeping, eating. And you know, aside from the core activities of sleeping and eating and finding shelter and maybe reproducing, most everything else, most of the other activities could be classified as hobbies or jobs. So when I say jobs, I mean things we're making money is the primary goal of that activity, and when I say hobbies, I mean things we're fun or passing the time is the primary goal of the activity. That said, shortly before I recorded this interview with Alex, there was one of these podcast or guru types that was out there making hyperbolic claims that there was no such thing, that hobbyist podcasters don't, quote unquote, actually exist. So of course you can't run around dehumanizing segments of the population when clearly eighty percent of podcasters are hobbyists. And just because you think it's a good idea to dip everything into capitalism, was like you dip your fries and ranch dressing or something gross. Some of US enjoy things for the sake of enjoyment and passing the time, leisure activities. So if you hear that tone come up in our conversation, that's where it came from. All right. So here is the interview with Alex Hobby and me, John Emotions, on Emo Dojo. Here's what's really cool too. Is like this show is about emotions, so I just called myself John Emotions. You Call Yourself Alex Hobby, so I have to ask, was that your name or did you adopt a name for your podcast? That is not my name. Is the name I adopted for the podcast for the simple reason I'm not ashamed of my family name. Is just I figured people are snoopy on the Internet and there's nothing to be ashamed of for my family. Haven't done anything wrong, but I didn't want them to go searching my other family member. Is just so they have their own life. I'm long life. I Love Them. It's just a cup, a little barrier. It's not like it's impossible to find me online my real name. But yeah, yeah, that's exactly my same motif. Well, I have lost jobs because of my mental disorders, so maybe sharing everything publicly wasn't the greatest idea. So I'm like I've been. Plus, I had a background in music anyway, so it's kind of common for people to make up quote unquote, stage names. So it didn't seem that weird to me. So do I I also have a background in music. Yeah, what's your background? What do you do? So I'm a producer. I've been producing music for fifteen years. I do everything from hiphop classical orchestra. I'm really into scores. It's been a while since I've been occupied with podcasting, but also do I wrap. So I just love the production aspect of...

...music. That's fantastic. Then I think we'll touch on that a lot when it comes to technical hobbies, music, podcasting, things like that. So tell us a little bit about your your background. How did you come to get so interested into hobbies, for one, and then to the point where you're focusing on them? And then how did you translate that into a podcast about podcast hobbies? So, yeah, I've I guess I've since it since I was a kid. I've always been interested in doing different things. My mother always wanted to put me in different activities. First it was soccer. It's like, Oh, don't you like track and film? Like I like track and fields. It puts me in trackings, like don't you miss soccer? Like yeah, I guess I miss soccer. Putting back and soccer. It's like, don't you miss track and fields? That you know, manipulative, but I think like, I don't know it was. It was getting me active. So I was always on the move and I've always been interested in like bugs, collecting Pokemon, cards at playing baseball in the backyard, would crab apples and building things with rusty nails and would that we find on the side of the road. I know it's the childhood of the s for me, example, but love as a group as I grew up. When it comes to talking about hobbies in my podcast, let's just say puberty hit me really hard in the sense that my voice got really deep and people like, Oh, Alex, you should do radio, you should do radio, listen. I don't know. I don't know what what I would talk about or if I would be good at it. And then over time I didn't think about it and then one of my jobs, or two of my jobs, I was a tour guy, and so that was me practicing my fun ability to speak to people in English and in French, share stories and then look like we were talking. Before I was really big into music and music production and anything related to audio. So I oh, this is interesting I want to learn more how to do this and as the years went by, I figured well, podcasting seems to be like an interesting thing, because my friend say it was saying that they were interested in starting a podcast. I'm like, you know what, I have all the tools in the equipment. Why not? I just give it a shot, because I have nothing to lose. And when it came to choosing a topic, I'm like, what do I want to talk about? I'm not knowledgeable and a lot of things, and I want to make this last long. I'm like, hobbies. What am I talk about? My hobbies? I'm like, Nah, nobody wants to hear about my hobbies. Why don't I interview other people about their hobbies? And it was a no brain. I'm like cool, that's it. And when it came to the title, time for Hobby, I'm my that's direct. That's what I'm talking about, making time for your hobby. Yeah, and for the first ten episodes, I've had friends and family come on, because that's usually the easiest thing to do instead of reaching out to strangers for the first few episodes. So I didn't want to mess up. I want to leave a good impression and yeah, I really enjoyed or enjoy present still doing it, talking to people about their hobbies, because people just light up and I have my own hobbies on the sign but the fact that I get to allow, I get to allow people, but people come on and share their hobby to the full, like extremities of like whatever they want to share, is like cool and I'm super curious, so it makes me want to learn more and I kind of sometimes when like who I really want to try that hobby. So yeah, I am that type of person. I love trying new things and I haven't tried out all the hobbies on my podcast. That would be quite the challenge, but I guess that's my way of doing it and I guess, to answer your question, if I'm not going too off, another reason why I chose the topic of hobbies. He's because my saw, my grandfather, my grandfather was an individual who worked hard his entire life. Until the age of eighty four, he kept on going to work and all he would think about his work, work, work, and when he was at home, where he could not physically get to work anymore, he was just there and he did not know what to do with himself. Didn't have a hobby. Didn't have anything like that and it was just eating him alive. Not Going to work. And for me, the idea to focus on a hobby is also super beneficial for just improving your mental state, making yourself feel good, and I'm sure you have a lot more questions regarding that. But Yeah, looking at my grandfather and the lack of his lack of him having a hobby with another reason why I decided to do this podcast, to help encourage people pick up hobbies, whether it's a big hobby or a small one. Yeah, yeah, that's really fascinating. I was doing a little research on hobbies. I'm all been like, like yourself, I'm super curious and there have been times when I raise my own kids that I would almost ruin their hobbies because I wanted to turn into turn it into something that it was not. They were just having a fun thing and I was in that point in my life where I'm like, yeah, you guys could like put up a Webcam and you could do a show and he could sell stuff, and they're like mom, Dad, reckon it. So there is a thing I was reading about like the I'm into etymology to like the source of words I'm like, where did hobby even come from? So apparently super old word from the fourteen hundreds that meant horse. So the term Hobby Horse, apparently that's all connected hobby horse. And apparently somehow in the...

...sixteen hundreds we just started using it as a name for a thing that we do that has no meaningful person has a meaningful purpose, but it had no results, like we're not trying to create results with anything and like that. That's fascinating. So so the idea since the sixteen hundreds is that people could just screw off and like take yourself away from something that does not include earning money. That's not the your hobby can't make money. But the whole purpose of a hobby is to distract yourself, much in the same way meditation and mindfulness in these type of things do. And you're right, a lot of people just they seem to have faded away from hobbies in today's hustle culture and everyone thinks that Oh, it's fun, I'm going to try to make money doing it and like well, okay, that's fun. Now it's your job. What's going to be your hobby now? So a lot of people are filling in their hobbies with work. They're turning their hobbies into work, and I think that's part of what's causing so much depression and anxiety with especially in America, where we're from. or well, you're in Canada, so it's probably sort similar there. But the idea that we just were we don't take time off to refresh and do something. That's just not part of the grind. No, no, I absolutely agree, and I would also imagine social media plays a big role in that. Before that, before social media, people just picked up hobbies and they carried on with their own lives as much as they can. It wasn't much focus on. You're wasting your time if you're not turning your hobby into a career, you're not making any money out of your hobby, then it's a waste of time. That one person who likes to collect buttons. Yo, that's fine. Collect your button straight up makes you happy. Yeah, how much money am I going to make for my butterfly collection? You know, it's it's not. It's not a thing. Like the whole purpose is to have a thing to do where you're not making money. It's almost like here's the thing that I do that's cost me money, like purposefully cost me money, and does not. It will never make me money. But so that kind of leads to my next question, though. So can't do you think, and it's kind of an open ended question, kind of philosophical, that can anything be a hobby? Absolutely well, within limits, I would imagine, in the sense if it's like a violent hobby, it technically it can be a pibe hobby. But I'm sure for legal reasons you can't do let's say, shooting yourself in the foot is a hobby. I you going to run out of the yeah, yeah, you run out a feat. Is that? They just hobby. But in theory, yeah, everything can be a hobby, from collecting, from learning reading. Like my grandmother, her hobby is walking. Yeah, yeah, physical activity, crochet and things like that. I love seeing old people even go down to play Bingo or chess or whatever they're doing. They're still moving their minds and their bodies, for sure. Exactly. So in my definition a hobby is anything you do do in your free time and if you do it more than once, like it's something you do. Doesn't have to be regular, you don't have to do like every single day. Maybe you do once a month or once a year. Like I'll say, skydiving could be pretty expensive, right, if you do that once a year? Yeah, and then it's your hobby and then in the meantime you learn about it, and I think that's like it ties into each other, the aspect of doing it and learning more about it. So let's say for you and I, we love podcasting. So when we're not podcasting, sometimes we're curiously. Oh well, it's just interesting Mike we can use or this interesting tool we can use. So you're learning more about your hobby and I think that's where it all starts. Like I can collect cups. My wife collects coffee mugs. Now doesn't use them all, but she collects coffeemugs and that's her hobby. She also paints and plays the piano, and I guess that's also a misconception that you're only allowed to have one hobby if people have multiple interests. You can have multiple interests because hobbies can satisfy different things. Like that person who collects it buttons. Yeah, right, that satisfies that collection aspect of the hobby, and then maybe they also enjoy playing video games. So literally anything to be a hobby. As much as you enjoyed. I can't see people who do hobbies that hate their hobby, kind of that fears the purpose of a hobby. Yeah, yeah, yeah, exactly. And then you so you don't harass your wife to try to monetize her mug collection. Right, no, no, no, no, okay, Ye, should kill me, that's for sure. Yeah, no, no, no. And she exists, though, right, so she is a hobbyist and she exists. So so hobbyists exists and hobbyists can do anything we want to do, apparently, which is the fascinating thing that I love that. What do you think draws people to their chosen hobby? This one. When I first thought of this, as I'm thinking of talking to you last night, I'm like, why do we pick our hobbies? Because I was looking into it. There's a book called wanting by Luke Burges about this thing called mimetic desire and a lot of it's mimisa. So I'm started to think, do we do hobbies because we see other people doing them, as like, is that the only reason I do a hobbies? Because I saw somebody doing it and look cool? But why do you think people choose the hobbies that they choose. I think the biggest element it comes in is curiosity, and it's not necessarily seeing somebody else do it. Maybe these song like a rock on the rose, like that's an interesting rock. Are All rocks like this or other different kind of rocks or like? Those are interesting birds. I wonder what other birds...

...look like. Oh, different birds in different countries. Right. So it's that sense of curiosity that ties us in, because without curiosity, I'm I'm not an expert, but I would imagine that most people would not start a hobby if they're not a little bit curious about it. So, when it comes to tying into how we choose our hobbies, let's say for me, podcasting, maybe for you personally, I love talking to people, learning about things, and maybe some other people are like I need something that keeps my hands busy. So and then you're like trying to figure out okay, well, crotchet your knitting arm. Well, I don't like crochet, but I do like a sewing God that keeps my hands busy. Let me try it out. No, I don't like that very much. I'm ready Rube's cute. And so they try to go through this whole process of figure out what can satisfy their Han need and there's no bad yeah, and sorry away now. You kind of hitting on a point that I was thinking of that I think about a lot, is that humans are into the actual activity. Like people like, well, what kind of job should I get, and things like that. Well, what do you like to do, actually do? Do you like to walk? Do you like this sit do you like to, you know, toil with your spear, small digit, your fingers, or do you like to lift with your big your limbs, your arms and legs? And I think that's what might draw people to the hobbies. Is that? Is it stimulating the part of their being that needs stimulating? Is it your fingers? Is it crochet, or is it throwing frisbees? Is it, you know, Frisbee Golf or whatever? Is it the the high intensity of maybe local drag racing or something people get into, like local car sports that can be affordable, things like that. But whatever it is, it seems to be I don't know it. Part of it must be that they're drawn to it because they think it's cool. Like I when I was a kid I saw a drummer, I'm like, Oh yeah, beating on stuff looks fun as hell. I'm going to go play the drums and like yeah, I was just going to just gonna add to that. I also think there's that misconceptions that once you pick up a hobby you have to go all in into it. There's some people who pick it up and do it once or twice, three times and they're like, you know what, that satisfied my need and you don't need to pick up a hobby and the society around it tells you, Oh, you're giving it up now, would a failure for you giving up this hobby. There's a deadline on how long you can do your hobby. You can do it as long as you want. We're short as you want, and you're not a failure for putting it down for fifty years. If, for example, somebody who really enjoyed surfing and when they were a kid and like Oh, I got busy, and then when they became a senior citizen, you wants to get back into it, that's cool too. Definitely new such thing as failures when it comes to hobbies, because it is your own time, you go at your own speed. Yeah, maybe that's why people like hobbies so much. You can't really fails. It's a kind of an ongoing process of learning and mastering the thing that you're trying to do, plus the whole quote unquote, monetization of everything that's relatively new. That's, like you said, that's pretty much an Internet thing in the past twenty years, where every everybody that does a thing, any kind of thing, they have been told or fulled into the social media giants that you can make money doing that thing. And okay, well, where's the thing people are doing without making money? People need time, downtime, I think, to just think and screw off. You call it whatever you want, but I think that's so critical, just to take a break from grinding the capitalist you got to make money at everything has to be a has to have a reason, which eliminates all of art, you know, like, Oh, there, are there any artist left if we do that? No, MMM. And you know what, that kind of pisses me off a little bit. The idea like that it's okay for people to go make money with their hobbies, nothing wrong with them. My issue is people shaming people who don't, as if there they are superior for not trying to make like, Oh, I'm making money with my hobby. I'm making a hundred thousand. You're not doing anything your hobby. Oh, you're so inferior to me, you're wasting your time, stuff like that. That that's a pet people of mind, for sure. But what here's part of it too, because I've made money that my hobbies and it turned him into bullshit really. So, for example, I've been into music since I was a kid, played the drum since I was three or four. Eventually I'm working at concert production company and then it gets bought by a big one. Now I'm working at live nation for five years right, and I couldn't tell you anything that took the fun out of my drumming more than go into the office every day and having to produce concerts for other people. So you really have to not be careful, but what you asked for, but like be aware of what you're asking for, like no what you're getting yourself into. So the idea of turning music into my job, like I had office, I had medical benefits and paid time off, the whole thing. I'm like, Oh, cool, I made it, you got to go all the concerts, get to do all the cool stuff. Right. Let me drive up literally to the backstage and walk in just before the show would start. Most people say, well, that's a dream job. Now not as a drummer. As a drummer I'm like, I'm just wrecked my hobby, like I enjoyed drumming and music for the sake of drumming and music, and now we've played this entire layer of corporatism on top of it just for the sake of making money.

Like this is bullshit, and so I could see it both. And now, as a as I'm a drummer, I've been paid to make a drum play drum. So you could say professional drummer, recorded toward all those things, but I played drums now with no intention of making money. I'm a hobbyist. So I think you can do both if you have the flexible mindset to be able to see things from others perspective and that you know. There's a lot of things I do now that I do both. I'm a graphic designer for my passion, like a heard jeto graphic designer on your show for hobbies. I also do graphic design at work. I'm a passionate hobbyist podcaster and recently things have changed the work to where I'm going to insert part of my passion at work and get paid at work to do a little podcasting as well. So they're the getting paid versus not getting paid. Things always a weird issue, because just because you got paid doesn't mean you're not a hobbyist, and just because you get paid doesn't mean you should be getting paid. You doesn't mean you're that good. You you probably just game the system, the marketing aspect. You just you know how to market your your yourself, and I guess to go on the same train of thought. So for me, my music, whenever I did my music, I never wanted to, let's say, turned into a business or make money out of it. I just want to do it as a d stressor I recorded many other artists as well, and there all this let me pay, you, limit pay. I'm like Na, you know what, I'm doing this for the love of music. For me, it's a training session. I get to learn more techniques and stuff like that because of this. When I started midway through, I was also in university and I didn't want to put too much focus on doing that because I really want to focus on my grades and get through university, because I'm dyslexic and just lexia. An education can be challenging sometimes, so I wanted to make sure that I got through the right way, and I did, and music was just going to be my stress reliever. Sometimes I just fiddle around with the piano. I don't ever create anything. I just fiddle around and release all this stress I have through my fingers. As for my podcast, I do make money. Everything is around like nineteen Canadian and these are things to my patrons, but once again, these are actually most of them. I've been guessed my show and they like to show but these are things that, if they were to leave tomorrow, I got we're done. I'm like, cool, that's fine. I appreciate the support they gave because I will still give the same amount of energy in my podcast whether I have my current patrons or more or none at all. And I think it was like for the first one hundred episodes I didn't have any patrons. So it's just like just given the of and on the other side, I know there's a question coming up for something else I'm not going to answer now, but I am working on a board game and I do want to sell that. But my hobby side of it is the creative aspect. I love trying to figure out the designs and mechanism and just stuff like that, because I grow up with Board Games and I love that element of it. So I have my music. We're just free being a hobby. PODCAST is monetized and then while also do soccer, not monetize at all. Not that good. That like hiking with my wife and soon, hopefully, when my son gets a little older, go hiking with them as well. Heck Ye, I don't think I'll be able to monetize that as well, but I do enjoy those because, once again, they all offer something different to my mental health. Yeah, well, it's fine, and they all take effort and they all require resources. You know, it's all the same things that work requires or your job requires, but it's sometimes people don't understand that. Sometimes you just give to give and sometimes that giving feeling it. Whether you're giving it to yourself in the form of paying for skiing lessons or going bowling every Saturday night or whatever, it's still a passion and a hobby and it takes effort. So the I don't know for every instance. Someone said, oh well, if you're if you make an effort, you should make money. I disagree, like why? Why should you make money just because you put out effort? Don't be lazy. Put out effort for the sake of putting out effort, give for the sake of giving and, in our case, practice for the sake of practice. I've told said many times on this podcast because I have other podcasts that are more business, e. podcasts, and I'm like no, this is my gm and this is where I come to practice speaking and editing and wrangling gas and this is where I do all the practice. So that way, when I have my business podcast, which of want, like an upcoming one for my job, all of the things I've been practicing during my hobby segue right into that. So my bosses think, wow, he's really effective. Well, it's not. I just been practicing my hobby and again, my hobby, this podcast for example, will always be my hobby, regardless of what other podcast I do. So the idea that you can't be a podcast hobbyist is ridiculous. So I just been. I talked about that a lot because my guests always wondered, like what should I do with myself? I'm like some of them might have government benefits because their mental health is in such a state. So they have time on their hands, not a lot of money, but a lot of time, and so I thought, man, hobbies are perfect. Like what are your some of the Fabe you're the coolest hobbies you've heard about, either on your show or outside of your show. This is one night bring up a lot...

...and the kind of this necessarily well, it gives me inspiration and it writkes me like happy that I do this more and more. So I believe the episode twenty seven, I interview people from all around the world and this individual was from the Republic of North Macedonia and he is blind, but as he was going blind, he was also a software engineer and he loved Playing Board Games and he knew he had a life changing events. Slowly, his iceight was deteriorating, deteriorating, and he decided to make an APP for himself so he can read it, can read the cards of his favorite board game, which is secret Hitler, so he can keep on playing it afterwards, so after he loses society, can still enjoy his favorite game with his friends. That's amazing and like for me. Yeah, that's the idea. Is the idea that hobbies it brings you joy. That for somebody like that to go through such a life changing event like losing one of your senses and try to find an optimistic side to benefit from it. And why not benefit from but like adapt to it, makes me feel like people have gone to so many extreme extents to just enjoy their hobby because their hobbies played such a significant role in dealing with less say, your depression, their anxiety. Yeah, I had a girl from Sweden. She listened to my podcasts and she said she was talking about it with her therapist, because I invite everybody, doesn't God, doesn't matter who you are, where you're from. If you love your hobby, that's your more than welcome to be a guest on my show. and She's speaking to her therapist and her therapist at give it a try actually like you know what I will. And then she came on. We really connected and she got to share her hobby, which I believe was making diy home cleaning products. So well, figure out different things to be environmentally friendly to say home. I've interview people who do plogging or yeah, plogging, which is picking up trash while jogging. Well, so that's cool. And then another guy in Scotland who does herbexing, which is exploring abandoned buildings. Yeah, yeah, I love that. So, yeah, there's hobbies from all walks of life. Some people are like more extroverted, hobbies somewhere more introverted, and I love learning more about every one of them. Yeah, what do you like about your hobbies right now? Um, who all my hobbies? My wife says I'm a very creative person. I always like to create things. Yeah, and I guess with my hobbies like the music, yeah, pretty good element to create things. PODCAST I get to not be asked creative, but I get to be more technical, which I love. With the audio and the creative side I let to I guess it's more of how I adapt my conversation with my guests. So that's my creative side. Yep, and the Board Game I'm working on. That is creating a board game. Let's talk about that, because that kind of intersects a couple of things and I'm curious about that because I'm always curious about people who are authors and right books, invent toys and board games and things like that. So you've got a new product around podcasting called pitch that pod. It's not out yet, but you're working on development. So if you people want to get in on it and just watch it happen and kind of follow Alex's journey on that, for one, go to at pitch that pod on twitter. And, just to reminder, we're talking to Alex Hobby of the time for your hobby podcast. So please, if you like what you're hearing, pause this podcast real quick and go save those things so you can get back to him when you're done. All right. Yeah, so let's let's get onto the board game. How how did you come up with an idea? Why did you think you needed a board game? Or again, is it a hobby? Is the creation of the board game part of Your Hobby? So, okay, how did I come up with a topic? So I've been podcasting for three and a half years and I always enjoyed loving, enjoyed loving, I always enjoyed playing board games and I love the game sneak oil, which is a pitching game. You can bind two cards together and you pitch this new idea to a client or what let's say, yeah, it sounds awesome. So for me I'm like, I love that Improv game and I see you on twitter a lot of people saying, Oh, I want to talk about something for this next episode. Any suggestions? I want to find ideas, and I'm like, you know what, there could be a game around that where people just pitch ridiculous ideas, but my end up being something they can talk about during the show. So I created a game and I'm still going through the play test. I think I've done around twenty. I want to aim for a hundred because there's always rules changing. I want to make sure the mechanics works. But the way this game works is basically you combining cards and then you have to adapt to another card and pitch that podcast and there's different elements that come into play and there's that connecting and there's even a wrench throwing in. They try to keep you on your feet and the way I'm making the game is try to do it so it's good for introverted and extroverter people. So the scoring mechanism might give a benefit for both individuals playing. In terms of the development, I did everything on Canava for the design. I'm a graphic designer but I love doing it right. Yeah, Sau see, there you go as I suck at doing it and I just but...

I love messing around with shapes and colors and do different things and learning more. I'm trying to learn more about photoshop and stuff like that. I have no knowledge of it, and this is the same with a Dubie addition. I had no knowledge of it, but it's more of like Ah, but I just trial and error try it out. If it works, it works. If it doesn't work, it doesn't work. There's always something else. Yeah, and curiosity. Yeah, yeah, exactly. And then I ended up joining a bunch of discord groups related to a tabletop gaming and designers, so that everybody play test each other's games and helped each other out, and I ended up making my game virtually as well now, so it can be played online with your friends, so it can go through more play tests. And for me it's a creedive outlook because one I get to create the cards, I wrote the rules, and this also helps my dyslexia as well, trying to make things that are more understandable right, and I just love the challenge. I'm putting myself into positions that I would usually do, but it pushes me to try something new and now I have one prototype. I want to make more. But now I'm stuck on the idea. Do I self publish, or do I pitch it to a publisher, like a big company, let's say, for has well, for example, or I do it myself? If I pitch it to has row, they take all the rules, everything, they have the creative aspect yet. But if I work to pitch it, are publishing myself. I get to keep the rules, the created elements and go into direction I wanted to go. So yeah, but I just love it. I've been playing in it for a while and in between my editing time and also in between my family time, family comes first. Got To make that the priority. Yeah, yeah, of course. But to our point, I mean it's great to have a hobby and the idea that you're sharing that you have a hobby. That means your wife and kids get they could all have hobbies. Let's I mean it's kind of like an in your household. Hobbies are an approved thing. Yeah, my wife has a little so we have a bar in the basement, just a bar and a little island. Yeah, but we don't really drink, so my wife turn it into a little art studio. So the sink is right there. Has Painting, so she paints right in the corner. That's for a little nook. That's right. I took up painting over the pandemic too. I got it, my easel and my paints all over there, ironically, right next to the kitchen, because I need to think. So that's a perfect art studio. And snacks. You can't forget snacks. Never plus, it's you're hiding your away from everybody. It's like, oh, mom's in their studio. Yeah, sleeve or beast, he's being created. That's awesome. He's ear thinking space. Yeah, how do you do? You placed in it much importance on measuring the progress of your cut, let's call it a hobby. But I mean even if you do a hobby that does nothing. So say you rake gravel, so you have a gravel garden, like at when you a Japanese Zen Garden things, and you can ever be perfect at it. You're always just practicing. Is Do you think it's important to measure progress in a hobby? It's it depends on the individuals, but I would say it's more of a short term progress measurement in a sense that that day you should do your hobby for how you feel, not like, okay, I'm going to do this hobby for how I'm going to develop it for the futures. Like, let's say today you have a really stressful day and you want to play some more music. Go ahead, play as long as you want. You don't need to put yourself on a schedule per se. I did it for my podcast because I do weekly, but I know if I have another kid it will break down to maybe once a month and I'm okay with that. The idea is that I'm making time for everything and I've got over two hundred episodes. I think I made enough time, but I want to make more. But it priority first and it does fulfill what I would like to do and I don't feel like I have to push myself for other hobbies, like music. I haven't done music in a few years, but I know I can get back into it and I'll be great. I'M gonna get my abilities have gone down, but I'm always willing to good back and learn more and there's no rush and there's no goal I'm trying to reach. Like the same with my podcast, for example. I'm not trying to be the number one podcast. My goal with the PODCAST is simply if my podcast can help somebody have a better day or, I'm get out of not get out of depression, but help with their depression, anxiety or anything else, then that's that's when I'm happy. I'm happy for that and I love the idea that it's indirect like, I mean never know, but maybe there's a I made an impact on one person that made their day better. Yeah, I'd love that. That's good enough for me. It's like a message in a bottle kind of thing. It's like, okay, I'm sending out a kind message here and I hope whoever finds it has a nice day kind of thing. Yeah, that's the same thing for ice. So I just sent you some tools for podcasting. In the back of my mind, I'm sending this not to try to get a benefit from it, but I'm thinking by me sending this to you, you're probably going to improve your podcast. That may help somebody else get out of the dark space. Yeah, I'm like, you know what, that's cool. That's that's what I want to do it for. Yeah, and and to that end, we're really just trying to make cool things, like a cool podcast. I just wanted to sound ride. I wanted to have all the right working parts of a professional...

...podcast, of one that gets paid. But I'm except for that piece. I don't need that piece. I have a job. I mean, everything's normal. So, yeah, I think that parts just really important. But, and I brought that up because podcasting as a hobby, like what do you do? Okay, well, I enjoy KNOBS and buttons. I like gear, I like going into Guitar Center and just fiddling around. That's enjoyable for me. I'll do that on a Saturday instead of go to target and run my regular errands. HMM, like I'll get in trouble from running the wrong errands. Like Oh yeah, how is it? Guitars, you go get the stuff that target? No, tell me know that. This was an emergency. Yeah, it had to be done. And then in with I don't think the industries care what we do either. They don't care for hobbyists or professionals, because I'm sure in music and in podcasting they sell way more gear and subscriptions to hobbyists than they do to professionals. So that's why I'm always thinking, like, don't bash people over the head because they want to have a pastime. It seems so just because it's a good idea for you doesn't make it a good idea for everybody. I feel like sometimes there's people projecting their own insecurities, and I don't mean that in a real, like an eat bashful way, but like somebody's like, Oh, you have I don't have time for a hobby. Like okay, but like instead of saying Oh, unfortunately, I don't have time for a hobby, I'm too busy with this in life and I have seven kids, comes out like yeah, but it's more of those people like Oh, you have a hobby. Yeah, it's the same people say, I don't watch sports or I don't watch TV whatever. Okay, cool, well, maybe should get a hobby. Most of the people that, if you've heard old people say, well, that guy needs a hobby. Well, that's that's so fucking true today, like a lot of people just need to actual hobby. Nope, not something that you think you're gonna be good at, that you could flip into money. Know, something that specifically cost you money that will never ever make you money. That's what more people need. HMM, because it has so much benefit to your mental health. Yeah, hobbies, hobbies, especially in like since two thousand and twenty, for example, think the world's just getting more and more chaotic and having something to ease your mind helps you deal with the madness. It does. And you can tell people who don't have hobbies by the way they act. HMM, yeah, it's they're really uptight. They look down on people. Well, and yeah, and a lot of them just think they know, they know it all, and they might know it all for their individual perspective, but they don't realize there's seven billion people on the earth and we all have seven billion different perspective. So barking around that you have the right way and you found the holy grail and by God, if you can make money, then you should make money. I'm like no, no, no, no, hold line right there, have some fun with life, relax, you know, to have your day job. Set some boundaries between your hobbies and your in your passions and your interest I was think it's interesting too, because I have lots of interest that don't quite make it to the hobby status. Almost like an Amazon wish list. Just save the things I'll get into one day, archery, and like to get into archery one day. That would be fun. Have you ever heard of archery tag? No, whole dude, that sounds awesome. What are you shooting at each other? Like just something on the and the end of the Arrow instead of a pokey thing. Yeah, so, but, yeah, so we have it in my city. There's a few of them. I don't know be might have it in your city, but basically think of dodgeball, but everybody has bone arrows and at the end of the Arrow it's like a giant marshmallow and you play like behind targets. So, Dude, I'm bringing this here. So right now I'm in a place called Oklahoma City and when I moved here I found out that they're super into Frisbee Golf. So they've gone these massive, huge parks just day dedicated to frisbee golfing. But I'm thinking, man, that is the also a perfect park for archery tag? Yeah, it's Super Fun, right, because the lots of tree he's like wooded areas and and things. The hide behind just enough so you don't get tagged. And a lot more running than laser tag, that's for sure. If you just have more one more space and not nearly as painful. It sounds like as paintball? No, not at all. Okay, unless you get into a special spot the yeah, get tagging nets, put eye out or something, but otherwise, man, that's just sounds freaking fun. I'M gonna have to look that up on the Internet. What a great hobby. Have you tried that yet? Yeah, I love it. My Wife. I play with my wife and my wife's Korean and Kreen's in the Olympics are apparently really good with archery. Ok, and so my wife's like, no, I don't want to do this, I want to do something like come, I will do it, and we started playing, and then we did with other people and friends. So they all I'm not good. And then two seconds later, is as if she likes switched on some her competitive switch with you, wanted to be smoothe and just annihilated everybody and I walked off like see, I'm not getting like you're lying. You're lying. I don't trust you anymore. You're going to conflict the accuracy. She's an archery shark. Yeah, she guys. I got this. I'm sure she was...

...in the Olympics in your past life. Yeah, like, Oh, I forgot to tell you. We do this in middle school for three years, just nine pm to two am. Yeah, that's half the morning. That's funny, man. But yeah, that that does sound like cool hobbies. I'm always in the interest for interesting hobbies. And to your point, yeah, if it's a hobby like, for example, I play the drum. So I hear a crazy song, I'm like who, I want to learn that song? Why? I'm not trying to play it. I'm not going to try to get that guy's Gig in his band and I'm not. I don't like live stream drum videos or anything like that. It's not it's just for me. I just want to learn to see if I can do it, and so then practice, practice, practice, but I notice the other day I'm like, Nah, fuck this part of my friends. I just I'm like that this I'm this is not me. Today I'm like that's a stupid song. You know, three days later I'm back there. Okay, I think I can get it this time. So there is something like continual mastery of something that you're not being paid to do. Is is great and no. If you could get paid to do it, would you know? No, it would wreck it. Some of these things. I would definitely wreck it if I got paid to do it, because then your mind shifts into focus more about making the money then making a good product, MMM, or good hobby or I don't want to call her product necessarily because we're selling it, but a good piece. There's a quote from Harold and Kumar, the first movie. It kind of applies. I'm transli translating a little bit, but Iteah, basically the guys saying, just because you have a big Dick doesn't mean you have to do porn. Oh yeah, no, that's just like what one of my relatives, my Grandpa, used to say. Just because you can drive attractor with your feet doesn't make it a good idea. I've always a thought that. I'm like, just because you can, just be can. People say, Oh, why did you climb a mountain? Because you could. I'm like, well, just because you can doesn't mean you should. So to each their own. And there's so much you know, everybody's a guru and a professional and has a hack for something on the Internet. I'm like that and you can't mean they're entitled to go do what they want to. But we're losing. I guess it's kind of like the social media argument. People say, Oh, well, social media is ruining kids, and I don't think that's true. I think it's what the kids are missing out on is what's ruining kids. Like when you're in social on social media L Day, it might not be necessarily bad for you, but missing out on hanging out with your friends in person and hugging and holding hands and climbing trees and things like that. That's that's the thing that they're missing and it's sort of the the same way with hobbies. If you are trying to make money, you are missing the key aspect of the hobby, which is, in the longer, becomes a hobby. Yeah, and its like if you're trying to get it into you like your main source of income. Yeah, it becomes your or even a side source of incoming. It can be, like you said, like you get patreon and inevitably some hobbies just going to get better at and money will start leaking in, no matter how hard you try to prevent it from coming in. But once it flips and becomes that's my prime drive. I'm not going to talk about I'm going to have to start asking people for things to talk about on my podcast. I don't even know what to talk about anymore. So I'm going to start asking people what to talk about. But goddamn it, I'm going to make a podcast every day because I need the money. That kind of Shit. It's like, no, that's just gross to me, but again, I accept it. I'm not trying to tell people who make money at anything to stop turn it back into hobby, and likewise I think it's great if people that make money doing things we consider hobbies would stop harassing us. Like you know, like we said, you're not telling your wife. Ay, how can you not making money with that painting? How can we not making money with your bug collection? Nobody does that. No, no, I'm not the type of person. He's like only into painting art. Cool. We're go to the R supply store. I buy her some things, she buys her things for herself. I'm like are we can turn like the whole basement into like a little art gallery just for us, kind of like thing, like yeah, hang up all your basis. I love the idea and it just supporting and we she encourages me for my hobbies and I encourage her. So it's that mutual aspect and in a way I'm excited for when my son picks up a hobby, whatever it is, yeah, I'm in. I'm not going to try to like steam roll and tell him what to do. Like my dad. I did taekwondo. My Dad has a bad knee, but he took up taekwondo for the first year to do with me, just to be like that father son experience. Oh yeah, that's great, I love that. And you don't know, I mean you probably will be overbearing to your kid and his hobbies. First you don't know, you don't think you're doing it, but eventually they'll push back and it's like, Oh, okay, there's the line. There's a line. Okay, didn't try not to be like my dad. Okay, I didn't want to take over your project and ruined everything. Just trying to be helpful because I see the potential, and I think that's a lot of what the the Gurbus do. They just see the potential and everybody and they just want them to, you know, live their best lives. But some people like, we're already living our best lives. Yeah, leave us alone. And kids are the same way. It's like I was having fun laying here on the floor flicking this bug around and it's like, are you sure you don't want to five hundred dollar gaming system? Now I'm cool, I'm a rubber band in this bug is fine, but now we try to force all this extra crap on people when sometimes it's the simpler is the better. And with hoppies I think that's really...

...the case. Starts Start smalls and there's no pressure. You know you're not. Don't compare yourself to anybody when you're starting a hobby. Why, like, why would you compare yourself down somebody else? Because there's so many great hobby shows, on to the metal working contestant shows like we they're making swords, the wood working shows where they're making crazy, you know, furniture out of wood. So there's so many things to aspire to. But again, I think people just look at it through the wrong eyes. Sometimes people don't look in at those kind of activities now as hobbies. I think they look at them as something that they can do because they have the skill set for man. Maybe I can make money doing that, but I'm just saying, you know, whole back say a hobby or two for yourself. Don't try to turn any that everything into a money making venture, because lesson you want to do is burn out. Yeah, and burn out your most fun things. Like the one thing not to do is take the funnest thing you like in life and turn it into work. Let me accrude. Example, be like sex. If you really like sex, like lots of people do, the worst thing to do would be to go be a porn star. You know, if you're trying to turn your your fun and your passion into money, that's a really crude but you know vivid example of why that's a bad idea. And I'm not an expert, but I could imagine as well. Once you take out the things that were fun for you to let say I enjoy collecting cups, but now I have a professional cup collecting kind of like business where I sell cups and have a bunch of different cups. Then I might lead, and this is case by case situation. I'm really lead to something else to deal with my emotions, whether it's a drug or alcohol or something else that might treader. Yeah, because I couldn't find something else to fit in that empty space. Yeah, like raging at others on the Internet to do it my way. I mean sometimes that happens. I'm going to go drink whiskey and rant about why other people are doing it wrong. That becomes a thing. Like find a hobby and and let people have hobbies. What are you athletic, but what do you think about athletic stuff as hobbies? Yeah, as long if it's something to do in your free time it makes you happy. Yeah, that's a hobby because you like, like I said, my grandmother, she for her eighty birthday, she did the commuter to Santiago walk, which is like eight hundred kilometers, wow, and she said, you know what I'm maybe I'll do it, and she walked it. Yeah, she just did, and she she did it to raise funny money for a fundraiser for her elderly care at home. So, but she did it for that and then sheet. But she always walks like ten to fifteen kilombers every day by herself, and she's like this in my my time. Yeah, walking. That's racing. And Tae Kwondo's interesting too, because it has a benefit, like obviously you self confidence and you know you don't get beat up and things like that. It also does cost money, and there you are measuring progress. MMM. So a lot of people would say, oh well, it's kind of like a job. You like you're always trying to get better. I'm like, well, that's the mastery of the skill part, that's the fun part of the Hobby. Then that comes into the how much you're interested into it as well. Right, would you do it if you're not getting paid? And that's the thing. If you say yeah, US, I would definitely do this. If I'm not getting paid, then go try it without trying to get paid. I think that's the most in once again, take whatever I say with a grain of salt, but I think that's the most important thing. When you're looking for a new hobby or picking something that you want to consider a hobby, don't go into it as in a I'm going to make a lot of money out of it. First, once again, grain of Salid. You can take whatever I say and say, Alex, you're wrong, you're right, cool, but this is my perspective because if you go in with that mindset, and especially in this day and age where there's a podcasting for example, where there's so many different podcasts, you're it's hard to reach out to everybody. Not Everybody's gonna like what you have to offer. Everybody has different tastes. It's like going to a buffet. Yeah, maybe broccolies are going to be more popular than the cauliflowers, for example, and there's nothing you can necessarily do. But if you start harassing people, then it gets into a steep slope of Oh, you're trying to gate keep, to manipulate people to come see your thing and all listen to your thing. Yeah, now, it does get to be that way if you start pushing too hard. Maybe that's it. Just I don't know, and part of it just people pushing too hard for others to be more like themselves, which is kind of common. I'm not going to say I don't do it. I definitely went through periods of my life where I did a lot more of it. When I was like a long hair rock and roller, thought I was top of the world. Yeah, I've an opinion about everything and my way is the right way. And what do you know? Well, yeah, twenty years later, I'm like it now, I'm wise. Now I'm just getting shut up and let people burn their own bridges. Yeah, and from burning their own bridges they learn as well. I hope like that, that's it will being for my son. I want to be there the father and I want to be present in his life and help them guide through things. But I know if I control every little thing, he has to also learn some failure like and the perfect example is a kid learning how to walk. They fall and you get back up. So that's part of the learning experience and you it's really hard to...

...force your own experiences to somebody's experience to make it their own agreed. Cool, Matt. So let's talk about how people can get ahold of you and how you wish that they would approach you. So, yeah, so months again. My name is Aleix, a hobby host of the podcast time for your hobby. I'm on twitter, twitter, twinter. Yet twitter is the new version of twitter notes. I'm actually on twitter and you can find me at Tfy H podcast. I'm also on Instagram at time for your hobby podcasts. Basically, if you just Google time for your hobby, you'll be everywhere. My twitter page has a Linkedin to all my other resources. I also have a pokat pockets. I have a bore game and working on I will doing some play tests right now try to figure out what works what doesn't work. That twitter is pitch. That pod and how you can approach me. Just say hi if you want to be if you want to be a guest on my show, tell me about your hobby. If you approach me saying I make million dollars, I do this, I have a successful business, I want to come and talk about my business in your podcast. For me personally, that's not who I'm looking for. So pass, but we can still talk. Yeah, like I've had let's talk about your hobbies, Mr Rich Guy, you don't exactly when you're talking about your hobbies. Just present me with your hobbies first. Don't tell me what you've accomplished in life, saying hey, I'll yeah, love making toy dolls. Right, cool, all right, I'm in. You don't have to impress try to impress me with any accomplishments. Is just impress me with your love for your hobby. Right, we'll get to that. If you like making jewelry, we're going to find out how you pay for the gold and the diamonds through the conversation. But it still should be a hobby. MMM, MMM, I dig it. You got a website up. Just use it. Used your linked tree for your website right now. Yeah, so, I currently just use. Why? I do have a website and I think it's I can pull it up somewhere. It's I use the free version because everything else is very expensive. As a hobby is expensive. Is a high the hobby. I'm already paying for the monthly and apparently dig care is like one thirteen hundred a month. So yeah, it's expensive. But my website, if I can fill it up right now, it is time for your hobby. Dot wickscom and on there. I have one of the things I'm pretty happy about. It's a world map. It's an interactive world map Lou where you can go on and you can see where all my guests are from in country wise and like, oh, cool, we have where I'm trying to a random country, Russia, for example. Oh we have Russia. Cool, this is a lad for Russian. That's his hobby. Click it. You can listen to flood right there. That's super cool. I like that. I might have to steal that idea. I love that a lot. I encourage it. Yeah, there's a great website. If you're music, you like music, there's a website called radio dot garden. Apparently Garden is a top level domain. So radio DOT garden and it looks like Google Earth Globe and it's got a bunch of DOTS. Those are all radio stations. You could zoom into and listen to radio stations all around the world right now. That's so cool. Yeah, you think that's awesome a lot. Unle see, I love that concept. Yeah, like you can travel everywhere and hear what people are doing, because it's fun to go to France and listen like it eleven o'clock on a Saturday night with disco music. They're talking about this podcast episode right now. That's where they can be doing. Yeah, that's right, so Meta. All Right, Alex, I appreciate you coming on. Man, thanks for spending time with me on your Saturday, and I know you got a kidnapping, so it sounds like we fit into the NAP schedule. I appreciate that too. Thanks to your wife for a sparing you during this time. Man, the pleasure was all mine. I had a fantastic time and I love this topic and if you ever want me to come back, I'd love to come back. You have been such a splendid, magical, amazing hosts that I appreciate that so connected to you. So thank you and I cannot wait for this episode of come out. Awesome. So, from the EMO Dojo, that's Alex Hobby, I'm Johnny emotions and we'll see you next time. Thanks, and now back to the wall.

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